Rebecca’s Bristol recommendations

by Rebecca Fong

Here are some top tips for making the most of your time in Bristol:

Food and drink!

Best coffee –  too many good coffee shops to mention. Try The Stock Exchange Bakery, St Nicholas Street BS1, Pinkmans Park Street, Laura Hart’s bakery at Temple Meads Station (it’s a hidden gem), Small Street Espresso, The Well on Gloucester Road and Mark’s Bakery in Southville. You could be drinking coffee somewhere else everyday…

The 50 Best Independent Coffee Shops in Bristol

Best bread: Good bread used to be hard to find, but now it’s everywhere. For CHEAP good bread, try… The Bread Store on the Gloucester Road (go at the end of the day and they sell of bread cheaply)

 

Best place to buy oriental ingredients for cooking:

Wai Yi Hong, a massive Chinese supermarket (good fresh food on Sunday mornings, Peking duck, dumplings, Chinese cakes etc) -Eastgate Centre, near IKEA. Big restaurant upstairs serving dim sum (take the same buses as for IKEA, see page 3 of this document) and then walk (about 8 minutes). Look it up on google maps.

Vietnamese supermarket, Gloucester Road

Korean supermarket, Gloucester Rod

Wing Yip – Thomas Street East (near Bristol Bridge in The Centre) A good Asian supermarket, with a Chinese restaurant above it (look it up on google maps)

Asian supermarket – Denmark Street (just next to the Hippodrome in the centre – if you are facing the Hippodrome, Denmark street is on your left, walk to the top, it’s on your left)

168 Oriental on Park Street

 

Best pubs/bars:

Too numerous to mention….

Several on the Gloucester Road

Roo Bar (Clifton Down) or Walkabout Gloucester Road – good for watching sports events

There are lots of pubs around the Corn Street area in the “Old City” (just off The Centre) eg The Slug and Lettuce, The Commercial Rooms etc etc

The Old Duke for live jazz and The Llandoger Trow – both on Welsh Back

Best pub terrace:

The White Lion (The Avon Gorge Hotel, Clifton Village) – go on a nice day and sit on the terrace…what a surprise…

Best bars:

loads of bars in Corn Street, The Centre, The docks area and Waterfront: Arnolfini, Watershed Bar, Pitcher and Piano, Mud Dock…..

 

Cheap and cheerful restaurants:

(too many to mention)

COSMO, (Clifton Triangle): Costs around £13 for the buffet in the evenings, about £8 for lunch, Asian food (Chinese, Malaysian, Indian, Japanese, Thai…). Student discount at certain times.

ZaZa Bazaar – Harbourside, Buffet like Cosmo, world foods. Various “deals” available.

DIY (Do-it-yourself):

if you’re decorating your room/house and want paint, the most convenient DIY stores are Wilko (Broadmead and Clifton Triangle) or Gardiner Haskins near Temple Meads station – you can get there on a number 8 or 9 bus, get off at The Bristol Evening Post building, just 2 stops before Temple Meads station; ….and opposite Gardiner Haskins is a good garden centre for pot plants.

Shopping days out!

  • IKEA just off junction 2 of the M32 motorway. From UWE, take a First bus 48A from UWE to Robertson Road (SW bound). There is about 6 minutes’ walk when you get off. Check this out online before you go.
  • CRIBBS CAUSEWAY – a huge out of town shopping park, you could spend a day there. Take the 19 from UWE go to Cribbs Causeway, the final destination (about 25 mins from UWE). Or from the centre, a 1 or ONE or 2 will take you there (about 45 mins).

 

Extracurricular activities!

Markets: St Nicholas permanent outdoor and indoor markets on Sat, Mon, Tue, Wed (food), Thurs – Corn Street Bristol (+ first Sunday of every month is The Slow Food Fair, very nice organic food). There is some really yummy “street stall” food here. Falafels, Kurdish wraps, Italian, Jamaican, Moroccan… mmmmm…

Independent cinemas for independent foreign films and old movies: Arnolfini and Watershed (both on the Docks), The Cube (King’s Square)

In town cinemas: The Odeon, Broadmead; The Orpheus, Henleaze (bus 2 from the Centre, to Waitrose Henleaze), The Showcase VUE, Cabot Circus (top floor)

Best swimming pool: Bristol University in the Students’ Union, Queen’s Road (a UWE student’s card will get you in for £4 a time); also Horfield Leisure Centre on the Gloucester Road (top end not city end)

Best classical concert venue: St George’s, Brandon Hill, just off Park Street; The Colston Hall (Colston Avenue)

Best theatres: The Bristol Old Vic (afternoon matinee tickets are cheaper); The Tobacco Factory, Raleigh Road, Bedminster (wonderful performances); The Hippodrome for musicals (The Centre)

Clubs and discos: As your fellow students…!

 

Travel

Best public transport: there is no such thing as good public transport in Britain, sorry…

 

Be aware that there are 2 bus companies in Bristol (apps and bus time checkers are available)

  1. First Bus (the “white” buses) and
  2. Wessex red (the red buses) – tend to be slightly cheaper than First

You can get cheap day passes on each (with student discounts) OR a BRISTOL DAY RIDER, slightly more expensive, which means you can use both companies’ buses all day. Without a discount, this costs £4.50 a day.

Confusingly, these buses mostly serve different routes, but there are also a couple of common routes eg First bus 1, Wessex Red ONE.

Bristol buses – student deals are available, visit the Student Union in F Block and ask about weekly/monthly/annual passes. Get a student card to reduce your travel costs. Online, pre-paid options where you pay with your phone, are also good value.

If you want to go to BATH for the day, get a “First day southwest” ticket on the bus. It’s £11 without a student pass and includes unlimited bus travel in Bristol and Bath PLUS the train fares to and from Bath.

Cheapest coach trip to London:

1) The Megabus from as little as £1 a journey. You must get your tickets online at www.megabus.com. Buses to London leave from UWE every day from the NORTH entrance bus stop (not the regular bus stops)

3) National Express student travel card for 30% off standard rates on all trips or book early and get their funfares.

 Trains: Trains are incredibly expensive in Britain, but if you book and pre-pay WELL in advance, using trainline.com or the national rail site, you can often get much cheaper “APEX” fares (you cannot change the times on the tickets though). Travelling on Fridays or at peak times (before 9.30am and after 4.15pm) is more expensive on trains.

Regular coaches go from the coach station to the train station/ to Bristol International Airport in approx. 45 minutes (cheap airlines from Bristol include Easyjet, Ryanair, bmi regional).

Buy a bike! – best place to get a bargain – check the “For Sale” section of the local paper, the EVENING POST, gumtree, or advertisements in small shop windows; you could get a perfectly usable bike for about £50 and never have to take a bus again! UWE also has bikes for hire – £50 for a year, approx.. Check the bike hub down by the bus stops.

When you cycle in Britain, you must follow the Highway Code (pretend you’re a car!). Wear a helmet, and/or a green cycle jacket. Don’t cycle on the pavement or the wrong way down a one-way street. Also, ride with care. It goes without saying that you will need good D-locks and lights. There is a “back way” through fields from Lockleaze into UWE avoiding all the major roads. SUSTRANS, the HQ for sustainable/bike transport, is located in Bristol and has been central in improving bike lanes etc over the years. Nothing is perfect, but the city is gradually becoming more cycle friendly. Please contribute to giving cyclists a good name.

STAY SAFE – only get a bicycle if you feel confident about cycling. If you do though, you will get an enormous sense of freedom for Bristol and visit parts that others never see J. UWE to city centre on a bike? 35 minutes, great exercise and it’s FREEEEEE….

Cheap hotels for friends to stay in: The Premier Travel Inn, Broadmead and many more. Airbnb is now also available.

 

Sightseeing in Bristol (All city museums are free – though special exhibitions may not be)

Best historical hour out: The Georgian House, Brandon Hill, just off Park Street

Best view of Bristol: From the top of the Cabot Tower, Brandon Hill, just off Park street, – go on, it won’t kill you, and it’s free….lots of squirrels in the park too!

Best alternative perspective of Bristol: From the Camera Obscura in the Observatory next to the Suspension Bridge – only go on a really sunny day or the camera won’t work!

Best rides: take the ferry from the centre – to….anywhere, do a round-trip stopping off at some pubs! The Official Bristol open top bus tour is fun too, about £6 on/off as you like all day

Best summer fun: The Harbour Festival (July), The Balloon Fiesta (around the second weekend in August), The Pop Festival (July), Grillstock, The Kite festival (early September), The Organic Food Fair (early September). Bristol is a festival city – 39 festivals between May and September!

 

I hope you have a great time in Bristol.       Rebecca

First year induction

We are very much looking forward to welcoming all new students and are currently making final arrangements for our induction events.

Students taking English Language programmes (either with English or Linguistics) are asked to attend our induction events on: Monday, 12th September from 1pm in room 3S710.

At this event you will get the chance to meet your course-mates, learn more about what you will be studying, get to know your lecturers and find out about the support available to you during your time at UWE.  We’ll end the day with a little party at which you can meet the second year students.

See you all there!

Third year modules

 

FAO: Final year students

We’re really looking forward to welcoming you back to UWE, after a hopefully restful summer!  You should by now be able to see your personalised timetable on myUWE, but in case you can’t and/or you are thinking about changing modules we thought it would be useful for you to see when things are scheduled.

Monday 9-12 Creative Writing and the Self

Monday 2-5 The Sociolinguistics of Language Contact

Tuesday 10-1 TESOL

Tuesday 3-5 Language Project (5 weeks over the year)

Thursday 9-12 Critical Discourse Analysis

Thursday 2-5 Cultural History of the English Language

Friday 9-12 Gender, (Im)politeness and Power in Language

Friday 1-4 Analysing Spoken English

Graduation 2016

by James Murphy

A few snaps from the Graduation and associated revelry.  Once again, many thanks to Kalei Sutherland for her brilliant organisation of the boat trip.  And to all of you graduating, we wish you every success in whatever you put your hand to next.  Keep us posted with what you are getting up to!

The language of ‘leave’ and ‘remain’ in the EU referendum

by Craig Evans

Voting day is upon us. After months of campaigning, the voting public will make their way to the polling stations to determine whether or not the UK will continue to be part of the European Union. For some, the choice they will indicate on the ballot paper may have been made long ago. For others, the decision is not so clear-cut, and it is these voters who political activists on both sides have been most keen to reach in the final weeks and days of the campaign. This means that, rather than preach to the converted, activists have needed to be more strategic in convincing the undecided that their position – be it leave or remain – is the right position.

One way to sway a wavering voter might be to appeal to emotion (‘pathos’, in Aristotle’s terms). For example, the fear of something that isn’t known (e.g. the precise economic effects of leaving the EU) or something that can’t be controlled (e.g. immigration). Regardless of the reality of either situation, this fear might be just enough to nudge voters one way or the other. Little wonder then that politicians have been shamelessly repeating expressions like ‘keep our seat at the table’ (Remainers) and ‘take back control’ (Brexiters). The first appeals to the fear of being shut out from a place of influence, the second to the fear of being powerless. Continue reading

Richard Coates on ‘Word of Mouth’, Radio 4

by Richard Coates

Richard Coates put in a guest appearance on “Word of Mouth” (BBC Radio 4, Tuesday 12 April, 16.00, repeated Monday 18 April, 23.00 and available on catch-up, short clip http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03qtqdr, full whack http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b076hrcn). This show is hosted by former Children’s Laureate Michael Rosen (a UWE honorary doctor, incidentally) and Dr Laura Wright of Cambridge University. You might expect something heavyweight after the appearance of the world-famous Professor Steven Pinker of Harvard University on the programme the previous week, but, true to the very wide-ranging concerns of the series, it was an informed discussion of the history of English house-naming. Informed, but easy on the ear.

Richard didn’t get a chance to discuss two of his favourite house-names: the heroes’ hall in the Beowulf poem called Heorot ‘Stag’, and the earliest name of an English house that wasn’t a pub, dating from the 16th century: The Vyne, a stately home in Sherborne St John, Hampshire. The owner knew his Bible – see if you can work out an explanation!

 

Descriptive and prescriptive grammar

by Jeanette Sakel

I was at the annual meeting of the Association for National Teaching Fellows in Birmingham these last two days – and not only did I learn a lot about playful pedagogies and show a poster about my short video summaries for language, but I also produced a short video on descriptive and prescriptive approaches to language. Here it is: